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Uncovering TV show truths

04th January 2017, 12:00 Hrs

Uncovering TV show truths

Pic Credit: pg 4- pre

As part of the Film for Thought programme, Sunaparanta - Goa Centre for the Arts will host the screening of the film ‘Quiz Show’ at the amphi theatre. This week the screening will be hosted by Arvind Sivakumaran. Directed by Robert Redford and starring John Turturro, Rob Morrow, Ralph Fiennes, despite being a box office failure, the 1994 film is now considered one of the classic films of the last 25 years. The drama which is based on a true story centres around an idealistic young lawyer working for a Congressional subcommittee in the late 1950s who discovers that TV quiz shows are being fixed. His investigation focuses on two contestants on the show "Twenty-One": Herbert Stempel, a brash working-class Jew from Queens, and Charles Van Doren, the patrician scion of one of America's leading literary families. Redford's prescient film reminds us of the perils of television and its tendency to corrupt even decent, honest people. It was nominated for 4 Oscars.

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