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‘Put Peace First’: New Year resolution from new UN chief

02nd January 2017, 12:00 Hrs

AGENCIES

UNITED NATIONS

Antonio Guterres took the reins of the United Nations on New Year’s Day, promising to be a “bridge-builder” but facing an antagonistic incoming U.S. administration led by Donald Trump who thinks the world body’s 193 member states do nothing except talk and have a good time.

The former Portuguese prime minister and U.N. refugee chief told reporters after being sworn-in as secretary-general on Dec. 12 that he will engage all governments “and, of course, also with the next government of the United States” and show his willingness to cooperate on “the enormous challenges that we’ll be facing together.”

But Trump has shown little interest in multilateralism, which Guterres says is “the cornerstone” of the United Nations, and a great attachment to the Republicans’ “America First” agenda.

So as Guterres begins his five-year term facing conflicts from Syria and Yemen to South Sudan and Libya and global crises from terrorism to climate change, U.S. support for the United Nations remains a question mark.

And it matters because the U.S. is a veto-wielding member of the U.N. Security Council and pays 22 percent of the U.N.’s regular budget and 25 per cent of its peacekeeping budget.

Immediately after the United States allowed the Security Council to condemn Israeli settlements in the West Bank on December 23 in a stunning rupture with past practice, Mr. Trump warned in a tweet, “As to the U.N., things will be different after Jan. 20th,” the day he takes office.

Mr. Trump followed up three days later with another tweet questioning its effectiveness. “The United Nations has such great potential but right now it is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time. So sad!”

John Bolton, a conservative Republican and former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said in an interview with The Associated Press that Guterres would be well advised “especially given the incoming Trump administration” to follow the model of his predecessor, Ban Ki-moon, and do what member governments want.

If he tries to follow what Ban’s predecessor, Kofi Annan, did as secretary-general and try to be the world’s top diplomat and what some called “a secular pope,” Bolton said, “I think especially in the Trump administration, he would run into big trouble very quickly.”

Mr. Guterres has made clear that his top priority will be preventing crises and promoting peace.

In the first minute after taking over as U.N. chief on Sunday, Guterres issued an “Appeal for Peace.” He urged all people in the world to make a shared New Year’s resolution- “Let us resolve to put peace first.”

“Let us make 2017 a year in which we all citizens, governments, leaders strive to overcome our differences,” the new secretary-general said.

Mr. Guterres has said he will also strive to deal with the inequalities that globalization and technological progress have helped deepen, creating joblessness and despair especially among youth.

“Today’s paradox is that despite greater connectivity, societies are becoming more fragmented. More and more people live within their own bubbles, unable to appreciate their links with the whole human family,” he said after his swearing-in.

Mr. Guterres said the values enshrined in the U.N. Charter that should define the world that today’s children inherit peace, justice, respect, human rights, tolerance and solidarity are threatened, “most often by fear.”

“Our duty to the peoples we serve is to work together to move from fear of each other, to trust in each other, trust in the values that bind us, and trust in the institutions that serve and protect us,” he said. “My contribution to the United Nations will be aimed at inspiring that trust.”

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